HOME
Set Your Region!
Keyword Search:





Running Time:
98 minutes

Rating: R Restricted. Under 17 Requires Accompanying Adult.

Rating Explanation:
for pervasive language, strong sexual content and some violence

Jimmy's Buzz Guide Review:
Billy Bob Thornton stars as the slovenly man in the red suit in a brutally funny, vulgar and sometimes offensive dark comedy that should please adult audiences who dislike most holiday fare and are looking for something off-beat and hilariously twisted. It's definitely NOT for children.

Additional Info:
DVD Features: Deleted and alternate scenes; Behind the scenes special; Outtakes; "Badder Santa" gag reel



Bad Santa
Each year alcoholic safe cracking Willie T. Stokes (Billy Bob Thornton) emerges from his booze-induced hibernation to team up with Marcus, his 3-foot-tall partner-in-crime (Tony Cox from "Me, Myself, & Irene") to once again become a shopping mall Santa and his trusty elf. Santa endures listening to kids' requests for several weeks so that they can pull off their annual heist on Christmas Eve. But this year they've run into a nosy highly efficient shopping mall manager (John Ritter in his final role) who reports his suspicions to the mall's detective (Bernie Mac). Meanwhile, Willie is becoming distracted by a perky bartender (Lauren Graham), who has a major Santa fixation, and a pudgy 8-year-old (Brett Kelly), who decides, for no apparent reason, that Willie is the actual jolly man from the North Pole and invites him to come and live with him and his grandmother (Cloris Leachman) in their big, empty house. Because of Willie's dreadful behavior, Marcus, who's the real mastermind of these heists, is beginning to decide that this will be their last gig. Not that Willie really cares. Hes so caught up in his own self-loathing he hardly has the time to notice his partner's growing hatred. Thornton's Willie T. Stokes is a blast, delivering clever insults and hilarious tirades in almost every scene. Equally amusing are his interactions with Cox as his abusive partner in crime and, especially, the young Brett Kelly, who willingly endures all of Thornton's profane diatribes without the slightest blink of an eye. Director Terry Zwigoff (Crumb) manages to inject several scenes of syrup-free pathos where they count, nicely pacing the often uproarious script by John Requa & Glenn Ficarra, which was rewritten by the Coen Brothers who also were executive producers of the film. It's got nicotine stains on its fingers, reeks of alcohol, and it's crude and crass in the ways independent comedies are supposed to be. There are surely times when it goes so far over the line of good taste that it's almost reprehensible. Only time will tell if "Bad Santa" will become an annual adult holiday classic or only a show-biz joke, quickly forgotten






Home  |   About Us  |   Contact Us  |   Advertise