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Running Time:
2 hours, 12 minutes

Rating: PG-13 Parents Strongly Cautioned.

Rating Explanation:
for violence, language and some sensuality

Jimmy's Buzz Guide Review:
RThis is a surprisingly effective seventh round that extends the boxer's saga in interesting new directions while staying true to its classic predecessors' roots.

Additional Info:
CAST"
Michael B. Jordan ... Adonis Johnson
Sylvester Stallone ... Rocky Balboa
Tessa Thompson ... Bianca
Phylicia Rashad ... Mary Anne Creed
Andre Ward ... Danny Wheeler
Tony Bellew ... 'Pretty' Ricky Conlan
Ritchie Coster ... Pete Sporino
Jacob Duran ... Stitch
Graham McTavish ... Tommy Holiday
Malik Bazille ... Amir
Ricardo McGill ... Padman



Creed
A surprisingly effective seventh in the series that extends the boxer's saga in interesting new directions while staying true to its classic predecessors' roots.

The opening introduces a 13-year-old Adonis Creed, a foster-home hopper in juvenile detention, walloping a fellow inmate. He was an illegitimate child, born after Apollo’s death, never knowing his famous dad. Apollo’s widow, Mary Anne (Phylicia Rashad), adopts him, and he grows up in luxury, but as a young man on a career track in finance, he’d secretly rather box, going to Tijuana, where he racks up a 15-0 record, after studying his dad’s fights on YouTube.

Spurned by L.A. trainers who scoff at his self-taught status, Adonis decamps to Philadelphia and tracks down the Italian Stallion, still running the restaurant he named after deceased wife Adrian. Rocky is convinced he sees Apollo’s talent in Adonis, and the training begins. 

Creed has its undeniable pleasures when that bell rings. The fight scenes, augmented by Jordan’s commanding physique and cinematographer Maryse Alberti’s nimble cinematography, boast a fleet, visceral immediacy, with Adonis’s debut U.S. bout thrillingly choreographed and shot as one circling, ducking, weaving take.

And Creed doesn’t forget to pay homage to Rocky touchstones, either: the iconic steps outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art get a sweet, poignant nod at the end, and Bill Conti’s soaring fanfare makes an appearance. But an attempt at giving Adonis his own training montage crescendo, surrounded during a street run by bikers doing wheelies, doesn’t quite work.

Few longstanding franchises have been so personally tended to as the Rocky movies, with Stallone variously lauded and vilified for scattershot handling of his own beloved American loser-turned-hero. If 2006’s correctively quieter, old-school charming Rocky Balboa felt like a fitting close to an invariably overextended series, you can see why this one — the first one not written by Stallone — suggested a reason to continue. But instead of playing like the first of a series of Adonis Creed movies, Creed never rises above being one more by-the-numbers Rocky retread.

The opening suggests thematic promise, showing us a 13-year-old Adonis Creed, a foster-home hopper in juvenile detention, walloping a fellow inmate. Coogler and co-screenwriter Aaron Covington’s sharp character notion is that Adonis, an illegitimate child who entered the world after Apollo’s death, has a hole to fill from never knowing his famous dad. Apollo’s widow, Mary Anne (Phylicia Rashad), adopts him, and he grows up in luxury, but as a young man on a career track in finance (when Jordan takes over), he’d rather secretly box in Tijuana, where he racks up a 15-0 record, and study his dad’s fights on YouTube.

Spurned by L.A. trainers who scoff at his self-taught status, Adonis decamps to the City of Brotherly Love and tracks down the Italian Stallion, still running the restaurant he named after deceased wife Adrian and wary about playing Mickey (Burgess Meredith’s father-figure trainer in the original “Rocky”) to another kid with something to prove. That reticence doesn’t last long once Rocky is convinced he sees Apollo’s talent in Adonis, and the training and motivational platitudes kick in. (“That’s your toughest opponent,” Rocky says to Adonis’ reflection in the mirror.)

- See more at: http://www.thewrap.com/creed-review-michael-b-jordan-sylvester-stallone-tessa-thompson/#.dpuf

The opening suggests thematic promise, showing us a 13-year-old Adonis Creed, a foster-home hopper in juvenile detention, walloping a fellow inmate. Coogler and co-screenwriter Aaron Covington’s sharp character notion is that Adonis, an illegitimate child who entered the world after Apollo’s death, has a hole to fill from never knowing his famous dad. Apollo’s widow, Mary Anne (Phylicia Rashad), adopts him, and he grows up in luxury, but as a young man on a career track in finance (when Jordan takes over), he’d rather secretly box in Tijuana, where he racks up a 15-0 record, and study his dad’s fights on YouTube.

Spurned by L.A. trainers who scoff at his self-taught status, Adonis decamps to the City of Brotherly Love and tracks down the Italian Stallion, still running the restaurant he named after deceased wife Adrian and wary about playing Mickey (Burgess Meredith’s father-figure trainer in the original “Rocky”) to another kid with something to prove. That reticence doesn’t last long once Rocky is convinced he sees Apollo’s talent in Adonis, and the training and motivational platitudes kick in. (“That’s your toughest opponent,” Rocky says to Adonis’ reflection in the mirror.)

- See more at: http://www.thewrap.com/creed-review-michael-b-jordan-sylvester-stallone-tessa-thompson/#.dpuf






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